Monthly Archives: June 2016

A Short Analysis of Thomas Hardy’s ‘The Ivy-Wife’

Words within words are there for those who choose to seek

Interesting Literature

A summary of a Hardy poem

Thomas Hardy wrote hundreds of poems over a period spanning more than 50 years; he supposedly wrote his last poem as he lay on his death bed in 1928. Although some of his poems are anthology favourites and well-known, there are many less widely-known poems in his Collected Poems which are worth reading and, indeed, analysing. With that in mind, here is Thomas Hardy’s wonderful poem ‘The Ivy-Wife’, with a brief summary and analysis of it.

I longed to love a full-boughed beech
And be as high as he:
I stretched an arm within his reach,
And signalled unity.
But with his drip he forced a breach,
And tried to poison me.

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Are You Sitting Comfortably? MONSTERS

An event which should get your spine tingling in anticipation. Delve into the dark depths of your mind for this challenge.

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Award winning White Rabbit  are seeking short story writers interested in having their work showcased at their next event “Monsters.”

They say we always get the monsters we deserve, that they are simply a dark reflection of ourselves, our fears and our desires. What makes a monster?
Are they amoral,inhuman beasts, eyes glittering with madness? Or beautiful and seductive beings, tempting us to sin? Or, worse of all, misunderstood creatures, unfairly hunted, lonely, unloved? We are hosting an evening of short stories read aloud, chosen and read by the team at White Rabbit. The evening will include B-movie visuals, monster mash music from the 1920s to now, ghastly games, free food served by a lycanthropist waiter, and blood drenched cocktails.

small medusa

Writers who would like their work showcased at this event should email a story of around 1000 words to areyousittingcomfortably@live.com by midnight 26th August 2016. Please note we prefer…

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Inspire us with your true travel tales

No harm in reposting this little reminder, travel-writing kit at the ready.

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Travel, Indien, India

Here we go!  Launching the 2016 Ouen Press Short Story Competition

Ouen Press are pleased to extend an invitation for writers to submit an original short story in line with this year’s theme – ‘The Journey’. Winning authors will receive cash prizes and be published in an anthology early in the New Year. This follows on from the success of last year’s competition and subsequent publication of the winning entries in Last Call & other short stories.

The short story must be true, but can be about a journey in any setting, of any distance, or at any time. The judges will be particularly interested in well-written pieces about encounters that have profoundly thrilled, possibly terrified or provided humour. The ideal submission will elicit a strong emotional response conveying travel experiences where the writer’s life has been transformed or enlightened as a result.

Deadline for entries is 31st

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Win a year’s access to online writing courses with Writers’ HQ!

This seems too good to be true. Just look at the criteria for entry. List the reasons you think you could benefit and you are in with a chance of a great prize. Bargain!

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Brighton Writers Retreat - General Logo - Web-01

To celebrate the launch of FIVE brand spanking new online writing, Writers’ HQ are offering FIVE deserving writers a year’s access to their creative writing programme, worth over £500.

The nitty gritty: 

Deadline: 14th August 2016

Prize: Access to our 5 short courses (7 ideas in 7 days, novel plotting, novel editing, manuscript submission & short fiction) for a whole year.

Submission requirements: Free entry! Just send us a sample of your writing (either the opening of a novel or short fiction piece – maximum 1,500 words) AND a brief statement about why you would benefit from our courses.

CLICK HERE FOR FULL COMPETITION DETAILS AND SUBMISSION FORM

More info:

As writers/parents/employees/freelancers, we know all too well how hard it is to hold down a job, wrangle a family, battle imposter syndrome and wrestle the evil guilt that comes with trying to carve out time to write. And in…

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TENBY BOOK FAIR 2016 STORY COMPETITIONS

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A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin’s ‘This Be The Verse’

Clever interpretation

Interesting Literature

A summary of a classic Larkin poem

Readers not fond of swearing in poetry are advised to look away now, for Philip Larkin’s opening lines can get pretty sweary. ‘They fuck you up, your mum and dad’: a memorable opening line for one of Philip Larkin’s best-known poems, ‘This Be The Verse’, not exactly a laudatory paean to parenthood. But what is Larkin’s poem actually saying, and why did he feel the need to write it? The following analysis attempts some answers to these questions. You can read ‘This Be the Verse’ here.

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Liars’ League Short Story Competition with The National Gallery

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Ng woman writing A Young Woman Writing, about 1530, after Jan Sanders van Hemessen, from the collection of the National Gallery

As part of The National Gallery’s celebrated Friday Lates, award-winning live fiction night Liars’ League is running its first ever short story competition for unpublished short stories of 1000-2000 words inspired by paintings or galleries. 

The contest is FREE TO ENTER, and the five winning stories will be read live by a professional actor in one of the magnificent rooms of the National Gallery on the evening of their Summer Late, which is themed around Inspiration. The event will take place from 6 to 9pm on Friday 22nd July 2016.

All five winners will be published on Liars’ League’s website as text, podcast and HD video. Winning authors will also receive complimentary drinks at the event and access to the Painters’ Paintings Special Exhibition(normally £10).

Interested?…

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10 Classic Summer Poems Everyone Should Read

I feel that the poems featured in this selection are less to do with, “Summer,” than many other aspects of life. Not my favourite selection but worth an introduction to you if you haven’t dipped into these verses before. What do you think?

Interesting Literature

The best poems about summer

‘In a summer season, when soft was the sun’: so begins one of the great long poems of medieval England, William Langland’s Piers Plowman. But many shorter poems have reflected the warm sunshine and sense of happiness that we tend to associate with the summer season. Here are ten of the greatest poems about summer – at least, so we believe. Bask in their warm glow by clicking on the title of each poem below.

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Interesting Facts about War Poets

Interesting snippets about a few of our most revered exponents of the poetic art

Interesting Literature

By Ana McLaughlin

As the hundred year anniversary of the Battle of the Somme approaches (1st July 2016), here’s a look at the most interesting biographies of our greatest war poets, and some surprising facts you might not know about them.

Lawrence Binyon (1869-1943) wrote ‘For The Fallen’, with its immortal fourth verse:

‘They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.’

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Popshot is now open for short fiction and poetry submissions on the theme of ‘Hope’

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2016-june-02

Despite having been on our list of potential themes for a while now, there’s something that feels rather timely about the theme of Hope. Although the mainstream media would probably have you think otherwise, it’s not that these are dark times or that hope is needed any more than it has been in the past. This isn’t the first occasion that we’ve had the threat of a lunatic in charge of a major superpower. Or that Britain has been on the cusp of a possible European fallout. Or any other current cause for concern outside of world politics. But for something as inherently timeless as hope, there is something that makes it feel strangely opportune.

Hope treads an intriguing path between darkness and light, positivity and negativity. It is the ground for believing that something good may happen, typically from a place where it hasn’t. And that dynamic from…

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