Monthly Archives: September 2016

A Short Analysis of Sara Teasdale’s ‘I Shall Not Care’

An excellent example of how good a short poem can be.

Interesting Literature

A critical reading of a short lyric poem

‘I Shall Not Care’, a short eight-line poem about dying, was once mistaken for Sara Teasdale’s suicide note, after she took her own life in 1933. The poem had, in fact, been published in 1915, in her collection Rivers to the Sea. We thought we’d share this little gem of a poem with you, and offer a few words of preliminary analysis – though the poem, written in plain and clear language, doesn’t need a great deal of critical commentary.

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Emptiness

When the last child leaves

the nest that once was called home

emptiness descends

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Adlestrop 

Having passed by the village of Adlestrop many times since moving to Northants and frequently passing by on my many returns to my Devon true home, I decided it would be inspirational to see where such a masterful poem was set down way back in June 1914 before events would change the face and attitudes of Britain. I was not disappointed as although the station and rail line are no longer there, the station nameboard has been erected on it’s site with the poem inscribed on a memorial bench where one can sit and think upon the wondrous words. The village is beautiful in itself, as to be expected in the Cotswolds. See below

The village also celebrates its connection with Jane Austen who visited there on at least three occasions to visit relatives and it is believed based some of the settings for her books on houses in the vicinity. Hopefully this will have been an inspirational detour and another , “must get round to doing ,” ticked off of my list.

I hope the photo may give you inspiration as well.

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A Short Analysis of Andrew Marvell’s ‘Bermudas’

Interesting Literature

A reading of a classic Marvell poem

Fancy a voice to a tropical paradise? Andrew Marvell (1621-78) provides just the poem in ‘Bermudas’. Marvell is one of the most critically acclaimed and studied poets of the seventeenth century, and his work is often associated with the Metaphysical Poets. In this post we’re going to offer a brief summary and analysis of ‘Bermudas’, one of his finest poems, which is written in tetrameter rhyming couplets.

Bermudas

Where the remote Bermudas ride
In th’ocean’s bosom unespied,
From a small boat, that row’d along,
The list’ning winds receiv’d this song.
‘What should we do but sing his praise
That led us through the wat’ry maze
Unto an isle so long unknown,
And yet far kinder than our own?

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10 of the Best Poems about London

A capital selection for your delectation and delight

Interesting Literature

The greatest London poems

Poetry is perhaps more readily associated with the natural world and the countryside than the world of smog and streets, shops and tower blocks, that we call the city. But throughout the history of English literature, famous poets have been drawn to the city of London as a subject for poetry – and so below we have chosen ten of the best poems about London, from the Middle Ages to the modern age. What do you think are the finest London poems?

William Dunbar, ‘To the City of London’. ‘Soveraign of cities, semeliest in sight’: so the Scottish poet William Dunbar (c. 1460-c. 1530) addresses London in this poem in praise of the capital. Nearly 500 years before Prince Charles disparagingly referred to the extension to the National Gallery as a ‘monstrous carbuncle’, Dunbar was favourably describing the whole city as a ‘myghty carbuncle’…

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Clouds and sunshine, Haiku #115

Through the clouds appeared

a slanting shaft of sunshine

my path to heaven

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RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #114 Magic&Stars

The magic is lost

when the truth about stars

is explained to a child

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A Short Analysis of Emily Dickinson’s ‘I heard a Fly buzz – when I died’

A bold interpretation of a thought-provoking subject for a poet and us all eventually

Interesting Literature

A critical reading of a classic Dickinson poem

Death is a theme that looms large in the poetry of Emily Dickinson (1830-86), and perhaps no more so than in the celebrated poem of hers that begins ‘I heard a Fly buzz – when I died’. This is not just a poem about death: it’s a poem about the event of death, the moment of dying. Below is the poem, and a brief analysis of its language and meaning.

I heard a Fly buzz – when I died –
The Stillness in the Room
Was like the Stillness in the Air –
Between the Heaves of Storm –

The Eyes around – had wrung them dry –
And Breaths were gathering firm
For that last Onset – when the King
Be witnessed – in the Room –

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Ronovan writes #113

Take me to the beach

just look under the old bridge

time to find your soul

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A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin’s ‘Sad Steps’

A summary of a classic Larkin poem about ageing ‘Sad Steps’ was completed by Philip Larkin in April 1968, and was published in his final volume of poetry, High Windows (1974). Larkin was in his mid…

Source: A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin’s ‘Sad Steps’

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