Monthly Archives: April 2017

A Short Analysis of William Blake’s ‘Jerusalem’

Food for thought, but despite the arguments for ulterior lyrical meanings it doesn’t diminish my admiration for these wonderful words.

Interesting Literature

A reading of Blake’s classic poem

‘Jerusalem’ is one of the most famous hymns around, a sort of alternative national anthem for England. Yet the poem on which Hubert Parry based his hymn, although commonly referred to as ‘William Blake’s “Jerusalem”’, is actually from a much larger poetic work titled Milton a Poem and was largely ignored when it was published in 1804. It became well-known when it was set to music by Parry during the First World War (curiously, it was Robert Bridges, the Poet Laureate and the one who got Gerard Manley Hopkins’s poems into print, who suggested the idea to Parry). In this post, we’re going to delve deeper into the poem we know as ‘Jerusalem’, focusing on William Blake’s use of language.

And did those feet in ancient time
Walk upon Englands mountains green:
And was the holy Lamb of God,
On Englands pleasant pastures seen!

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A Short Analysis of Thomas Hardy’s ‘Afterwards’

Interpretation of a finely crafted contemplation of life’s journey’s one, true, inevitable destination

Interesting Literature

A summary of a classic poem

‘Afterwards’ is one of Thomas Hardy’s most famous and widely anthologised poems. The poem was published in Hardy’s 1917 volume Moments of Vision. Like many of Hardy’s poems, it has received relatively little critical analysis – little when we consider that Hardy is thought of as one of the major writers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Afterwards

When the Present has latched its postern behind my tremulous stay,
And the May month flaps its glad green leaves like wings,
Delicate-filmed as new-spun silk, will the neighbours say,
‘He was a man who used to notice such things’?

If it be in the dusk when, like an eyelid’s soundless blink,
The dewfall-hawk comes crossing the shades to alight
Upon the wind-warped upland thorn, a gazer may think,
‘To him this must have been a familiar sight.’

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Images in humanity

They strain at the leash,

their chains seem but as fine threads,

faces of despair.

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Ronovan writes #146

SAM_1485.JPG

the eye of Horus,

beholden to protect you

if you would have faith

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Share Your Writing!

Sounds so good, I feel we should promote this excellent scheme which should be a benefit to freshly published writers everywhere.

charles french words reading and writing

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(https://pixabay.com)

Hello to everyone! I want to offer an opportunity for all writers who follow this blog to share information on their books. It can be very difficult to generate publicity for our writing, so I thought this little effort might help.  All books may be mentioned, and there is no restriction on genre. This include poetry and non-fiction.

If this event is successful, I will do this about once a month.  To participate, simply give your name, your book, information about it, and where to purchase it in the comments section. Then please be willing to reblog and/or tweet this post. The more people that see it, the more publicity we can generate for everyone’s books.

I hope this idea is successful, and I hope many people share information on their books!

wp-1476386546701-maledicus 

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book…

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April Round-Up

Plenty to interest you in this mid-month round up. Opportunities for all.

ShortStops

Lit Mags & Anthologies

The A3 Review tells us about its new things: An issue, A Contest and A3 on Instagram. Bunbury is back with Issue 15 and some exciting news. Fictive Dream is open to submissions of short stories and flash fiction. DNA magazine asks if writing for DNA magazine is on your list of things to do. to be published in 2018.

Competitions

The Casket of Fictional Delights is running a flash fiction competition, deadline 31 May.  The 2017 Crediton Short Story Competition is now accepting entries, deadline 20 April, and you have until April 26th to enter the Shooter short story competition. The Reflex summer flash fiction competition is now open, deadline May 31.

Live Lit & Book Tours

Arachne Press presents Liam Hogan on a book tour for his new short story collection, Happy Ending NOT Guaranteed. While Talking Tales’ submissions are now…

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Ronovan  writes#145

Being beautiful

can be a deadly curse for 

Birds of Paradise

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Twittering tales #25

On the other side lies fame and fortune or a very rapid descent into oblivion. Let’s do it boys.

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Ronovan writes#144

Did the spy wonder

when he came in from the cold

Can I stand the heat?

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10 Short Amy Lowell Poems

Admirably sharp shorts to savour.

Interesting Literature

The best short poems by Amy Lowell

Amy Lowell (1874-1925) is perhaps best-known for being the figurehead and ringleader for Imagism after Ezra Pound, who had founded that movement, grew jaded with it and moved on to Vorticism. Although her poems were less ‘classical’ and restrained than those by Pound, Lowell’s poetry is often true to Imagist ideals of brevity and vividness, and the ten poems included in this blog post bear this out. There are ten of the finest short Amy Lowell poems – we hope you enjoy them.

Middle Age

Like black ice
Scrolled over with unintelligible patterns
by an ignorant skater
Is the dulled surface of my heart.

Wind and Silver

Greatly shining,
The Autumn moon floats in the thin sky;
And the fish-ponds shake their backs and
flash their dragon scales
As she passes over them.

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