An advisory gem from Nick Daws Entrepeneur Writer

Ten Top Tips for Winning Short Story Contests
APRIL 10, 2017

Ten Top Tips for Winning Short Story Contests

As well as being fortunate enough to win several short story contests, I have been asked to judge a few. So I thought today I would share some tips that come at least partly from my judging experience..

1. Most important of all, obey the contest rules. It they say the maximum is 1500 words, don’t submit 2000. An entry that clearly breaks the rules has no chance of winning.

2. Don’t enter the same story in more than one contest at a time. It will be embarrassing to both you and the organizers if the same story wins or places in both contests, and you may end up forfeiting your prize (or prizes).

3. Try to come up with an original idea or angle. Remember that your story will be competing with many others, so avoid the predictable plots that have been done to death, or at least give them a fresh twist. A clever double-twist ending that surprises the judges and subverts their expectations can be a winning formula.

4. Twist endings aren’t essential, though (unless that is specified in the rules). A story that engages with the reader on an emotional level and leaves him/her something to ponder can also be a strong contender in a short story contest.

5. Other things being equal, avoid submitting stories that are laden with doom and gloom. As a judge I’ve been amazed (and depressed) by the high proportion of miserable, downbeat tales that are entered in competitions. That’s not to say such stories can’t be good, but judges are only human. Faced by story after story brimming with misery, when we come across a tale with a bit of humour it really stands out. So go easy on the negativity. Witty, humorous stories (even dark humour) are far more likely to catch the judge’s eye, partly because they are so unusual. And even if you don’t end up winning, my fellow judges and I will be grateful to you for brightening our day!

6. Avoid cliches such as ‘she was a mine of information’ or ‘he was as cool as a cucumber’. These are signs of lazy writing and won’t impress the judges.

7. Likewise, try to avoid stereotyping. Just as judges are familiar with all the usual plot twists, so they can recognize flat, two-dimensional characters. Admittedly short stories don’t allow much space for characterization and character development. But if you can go beyond the standard stereotypes and present readers with interesting and surprising characters who spring to life off the page, it will greatly boost your chances of success.

8. Check and double-check your spelling, grammar and punctuation. No story that demonstrates a lack of attention to the basics of good English is likely to win a contest. Ideally, have someone else who is good at this check your entry for you before submitting it.

9. Don’t be too despondent if your story doesn’t win or even place. In most competitions there are hundreds of entries, and luck and the judges’ personal tastes inevitably play a part. I have had a story come nowhere in one contest and win another. If you are confident of the quality of your story, give it another polish and send it out again when a suitable opportunity arises.

10. If possible, though, take the trouble to read the stories that do win and see what this tells you about what the judges were looking for. Compare your own story honestly with those of the winners and see what they did that you didn’t (although bear in mind my comments above).

Leave a comment

Filed under Re-blogged

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Our Literary Journey

Driveling twaddle by an old flapdoodle.

like mercury colliding...

...moments of unexpected clarity

Colleen M. Chesebro

Prose Metrist, Novelist, & Word Witch

Rose English UK

Read-a-holic

The Writer Next Door | Vashti Q

Vashti Quiroz-Vega, Author, Horror, Fantasy, Thriller, Short Stories & Articles

The Diary of a Country Bumpkin

A QUIRKY LOOK AT MODERN LIFE

Wisdom from The Lord of the Rings

A weekly blog exploring the wisdom of The Lord of the Rings

The religious imagineer

Where the fire and the rose are one

Let's Write......

the magic begins the moment you start being yourself

Stories by Patricia Furstenberg

Find Your Next Best Read ~ 'For what is wind, but the amassed power of words long ago uttered?'

the poet's billow

a resource for moving poetry

The History Jar

English History from 1066

LauraElizaHaynes

Musings from an insignificant writer

Bonjour From Brittany

Celebrating what makes Brittany unique

Jean Lee's World

Author of Young Adult Fantasy

Eugi's Causerie

a place to chat

culturevultureexpress

A little bit of everything

Sammi Cox

Author Aspiring

Goutam's Writings

Poetry from my pen

Greg's Business History

Ultimately, a real understanding of history means that we face *nothing* new under the sun.” – James Mattis

- MIKE STEEDEN -

THE DRIVELLINGS OF TWATTERSLEY FROMAGE

I Write Her

my humanity in written form

Matthew Richardson

Published in Gold Dust magazine, Literally Stories, Near to the Knuckle, McStorytellers, Penny Shorts, Soft Cartel, Whatever Keeps the Lights On, and Shooter magazine.

mused.blog

Just another blog of random thoughts.

tinythoughtspoetry

Aspiring to be the best at writing. Poetry lover, haiku and free verse to be precise, I hope to one day master

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

The writerly musings of Connie J. Jasperson, author, blogger and medieval renaissance woman.

Maria Haskins

Writer & Translator

K.M. Allan

Writing Advice From A YA Author Powered By Chocolate And Green Tea

A Dalectable Life

Doing the best I can to keep it on the bright side

ecogreenlove

A community with environmental and healthy resources

Myths of the Mirror

Life is make believe, fantasy given form

Rudy u Martinka

What the world needs now in addition to love is wisdom. We are the masters of our own disasters.

BeaconLit

The yearly literary festival in the heart of Buckinghamshire

Tina Stewart Brakebill

Writer. Feminist. Historian. Person.

crispina kemp

A creative miscellany of mythic fantasies

Nicholas C. Rossis

Award-winning, dream-protecting author

thedihedral.wordpress.com/

Climbing, Outdoors, Life!

thedrabble.wordpress.com/

Shortness of Breadth

%d bloggers like this: