Category Archives: Uncategorized

Folk tales, local legends and fairy stories? – Guest posts wanted!

What an invitation. Come on, our lives have been spent in the shadow of people, places and events, real or unreal and it would be such a shame not to pass them on and told of as they should be.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

It is five o’clock here in England and my daily featured spot is empty again. I feel unwanted, abandoned, bereft… Here I am, all ready to welcome guests, and not a guest in sight! I could just sigh and reblog a post I have enjoyed, or I can use the space to offer it  to you. I already have the regular Be My Guest and the Elusive Realities series detailed below, but what if I asked for something else?

I love learning about different times and places, especially the kind of lore that seldom makes it into books. The blogosphere has no nationality and encompasses the whole world…  what better place to learn?

How did your granny predict the weather? What did your great uncle Albert tell you about the little green men he saw in the woods that night? What strange creature stalks the woods in your area?

So…

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Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge NO. 92, “Bewitch & Treasure,” #SynonymsOnly, tales from the Argo

life-is-likea-cup-of-tea

By lust for riches

and impolite behaviour

we became swine.

Jason through  his piety

made Circe reverse her spell.

 

 

 

 

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Using polarity in literature #amwriting

We all know opposites attract—it seems to be a fundamental law of physics. It is as if the one end of the magnetic spectrum supplies a needed missing element for the other, something they can’t resist.

In literature, polarity gives your theme dimension. Remember, the theme is the backbone of your story, the thread that runs though it and connects the disparate parts. Themes are often polarized: One obvious polarity in literature is good vs. evil. Another is love vs. hate.

The circle of life explores birth, growth, degeneration, and death. Young vs. oldis a common polarity—many times we find opportunities for conflict within the family. Both sides of this age-old conflict tend to be arrogant and sure of their position in each skirmish.

Wealth vs. poverty offers the opportunity to delve into social issues and inequities.

But looking beyond the obvious are the subtle polarities we can instill into our work, the small subliminal conflicts that support the theme and add texture to the narrative.

Consider justice. Without injustice, there is no need for justice. Justice only exists because of injustice.

Or pain–the absence of pain, emotional or physical, is only understood when someone has suffered pain. Until we have felt severe pain, we don’t even think about the lack of it. In literature, emotional pain can be a thread adding dimension to an otherwise stale relationship.

Truth and falsehood (reality/unreality) go a long way toward adding drama to a plot and provide a logical way to underscore the larger theme.

Ease should be framed with difficulty.

Many commonly used words have opposites, such as the word attractive, the opposite of which is repulsive. When you really want to add texture to your narrative, look at how you could apply the ideas generated by your list of antonyms, words with the opposite meanings.

Think about how some of the concepts of the more common “D” words with opposites could be used to good effect:

  • dangerous – safe
  • dark – light
  • decline – accept
  • deep – shallow
  • definite – indefinite
  • demand – supply
  • despair – hope
  • discourage – encourage
  • dreary – cheerful
  • dull – bright, shiny
  • dusk – dawn

I love and regularly use the Oxford Dictionary of Synonyms and Antonyms to spur my creativity. It can be purchased in paperback, so it’s not too spendy. Often you can find these sorts of reference books second hand.

The internet is also your friend. A large, comprehensive list of common antonyms can be found at Enchanted Learning. If you don’t have the Oxford Dictionary of Synonyms and Antonyms and are feeling the financial pinch most authors feel, this is a free resource.

Applied with a deft hand, opposites add dimension and rhythm to our work. Polarity is an essential tool of world building, as small polarities in the interactions your characters have with each other add to the atmosphere and serve to show their world in subtle ways.

  • courage – cowardice
  • create – destroy
  • crooked – straight/honorable
  • cruel – kind

What polarities can you use to your advantage in your current work in progress? When inserted unobtrusively they become invisible, an organic part of the larger picture. Yet, each small polarity will create a little conflict, push your characters a bit further, and underscore your larger theme.

These are just a few ideas and thoughts to help you jump start your work, if you’re a little stranded. Happy writing!

It may seem obvious but this topic remains in the background and is dragged from the shadows very well here

Re-blogged from Life in the Realm of Fantasy 

Connie J Jasperson

Life in the Realm of Fantasy

We all know opposites attract—it seems to be a fundamental law of physics. It is as if the one end of the magnetic spectrum supplies a needed missing element for the other, something they can’t resist.

In literature, polarity gives your theme dimension. Remember, the theme is the backbone of your story, the thread that runs though it and connects the disparate parts. Themes are often polarized: One obvious polarity in literature is good vs. evil. Another is love vs. hate.

The circle of life explores birth, growth, degeneration, and death. Young vs. old is a common polarity—many times we find opportunities for conflict within the family. Both sides of this age-old conflict tend to be arrogant and sure of their position in each skirmish.

Wealth vs. poverty offers the opportunity to delve into social issues and inequities.

But looking beyond the obvious are the subtle polarities we…

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Hive & Keeper: Putting British honey, the bees and the beekeepers back on the map

Not only do we get a great taste experience it may encourage the saving of our bees.

Life & Soul Magazine

British honey is a reflection of the magical isle that the bees inhabit – rich, diverse and spectacular with the taste, colour and textures varying widely, from dark brown to almost white, from spicy to nutty and fruity, and from runny smooth to set with a granular bite. Honouring the colourful and epic journey of the bees, and capturing their essence in their most natural state is Emily Abbott, London beekeeper and founder of Hive & Keeper.

Hive & Keeper pays homage to the diversity of British honey by offering consumers limited-edition British raw honeys from small-scale beekeepers. Each honey is taken straight from the hive, left as the bees made it and in its purest state. Each jar of honey provides a snapshot in time of the bees, landscape and weather.

What started as a hobby for the south London born-and-raised Emily Abbott has now turned into a business. “I started beekeeping…

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Thinking of refreshing the skills?

via Haringey Literature Live – a wealth of Masterclasses and Short Writing Courses coming up

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Thoughts on nature now that Spring is upon us

The best English poems about nature Nature is one of the great themes of poetry, and also provides poets with a storehouse of vivid and useful images. Below, we’ve chosen ten of the very best nature poems in English literature. Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, ‘The Soote Season’. This is one of the first sonnets […]

via 10 of the Best Nature Poems Everyone Should Read — Interesting Literature

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How to Avoid Info-Dumps in Your Stories

Sage advice for students of the art such as I

A Writer's Path

by Ryan Lanz

Dumping is rarely appreciated anywhere, and inside your novel is no different.

When I started writing, I can remember feeling the urge to clue the reader in on every tidbit of information on a character/setting, including the culture, people, landscape, type of plants that grow there, every holiday, flavors of tea consumed, what type of bear is best (a Jim Halpert reference), etc.

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First Line Friday – March 2nd, 2018

9E7CC0CF-2985-42E4-B842-58A87CE951E8The words blurred into one another, every yellowed page like the one before.  I knew that before long, the library would be closing, and a polite steward would come to visit me at my desk. I couldn’t afford to stop my search now. Tonight was the night of the Supermoon. If I were unable to find the words there would be a great calamity in the district and all my searching would have been in vain. I was almost there, of this I was certain. Rapidly flicking through the pages to page 298 I noticed a scribble in the margin. Was this the incantation I had been seeking? Sadly I would not be able to find out as without warning the lights were extinguished and alarms started to sound throughout the previously almost silent hall. 

A highly charged voice came out of the speakers in firm but polite tones, “Ladies and gentlemen, the management apologise for this interruption but we would kindly ask everyone to make their way to the fire exits, there is no cause for panic.”

This was my chance. Picking up the heavy tome, I tucked it under my arm and attempting to suppress my feeling of guilt, concealed it under my cloak. Making my way to the nearest exit I gave my name to the attendant that he may strike it from his list of subscribers, in assurance of my safety, and set off down the road in order that I might continue my researches before the night’s trials that I would have to face if I was to rid the world of this ancient evil for this lunar period at least.

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Ronovan writes weekly challenge #Haiku #191

ronovan-writes-haiku-poertry-challenge-image-20161

A sneak in the night

his nose and whiskers twitching

timorous beastie

 

 

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Invertebrate intelligence

Proudly,
antennae held aloft,
she lays a single egg,
in this act, the meaning of life,
answered

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