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Monthly Archives: November 2018

#MLMM’s #Heeding Haiku With Chèvrefeuille, November 14th 2018, journey

We take up the book

and flick open the first page,

our journey begins.

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Filed under As you read it, Factual, Haiku, Self compositions

Carrot ranch #Flash Fiction: 15th November #scraps

Josiah’s whiskers twitched excitedly. The smell of putrefaction invaded his nostrils.It had been a lean couple of weeks but there was a hint of good times to come.

He had crouched watching the working men for two days. Had they seen him they  would have shouted at him and tried to beat him with their shiny-ended sticks but they had been too intent on their task.

Flowers now covered the dark patch of loose soil but he knew it was easy to burrow down and feast upon the box of scraps they always left in these strange caves.

 

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Filed under As you read it, Flash fiction, No offence intended, Self compositions

Another wondrous Sue Vincent’s #Thursday photo prompt: Shadows #writephoto

shadows

When your time is done

the company of shadows

is all you will keep

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Filed under As you read it, Haiku, Self compositions

For those who like to write the Gothic genre or would like a change, info courtesy of Short Stops

A Gothic Short Story Writing Competition
Hosted by Tavistock Library https://www.facebook.com/TavistockLibrary/ and supported by Tavistock Heritage Trust https://www.heritageintavistock.org/ as part of ‘Tavistock’s 1st Gothic and Neo-Gothic Celebration – Literature, Art, Architecture, Theatre, Film and Creative Fun.’

From Saturday the 12th of October and culminating in a market and author event on Saturday the 19th of October 2019.

This new celebration aims to encompass writing, film, drama and art activities.  There will be a Gothic market for writers and traders to showcase their work, and a range of related events.

Theme: A short story in the Gothic tradition incorporating folklore and myth.

Prizes: A cash prize will be offered to the overall winner 30% of all entry receipts will form the prize fund. There will also be a second prize of 30% of all the entry fees awarded to a ‘Gothic’ story based in Tavistock and incorporating its Gothic and Neo-Gothic Heritage. Additional runners-up prizes of books will also be awarded. The prize winners will be notified approximately two weeks prior to the prize giving. The remaining 40% of the entry fees will be used for administration costs and for festival and library events.

 

Presentation of the Prizes: The results will be announced, and the prizes presented at an event to be during the celebration.

Judging: The judging will be in two stages. The final short list of stories will be judged by a panel of librarians, authors and publishers. Shortlisted entries will be ranked by a final judging panel.

Tips: The judges will be looking for interesting and original stories that are factually correct where appropriate.

Publication: Depending on the number and quality of the entries received an e-anthology may be published.

A Gothic Short Story Writing Competition
For anyone over the age of 18

Rules and Conditions of Entry

  1. Entries must be in English, original and not previously published in any form or broadcast, and no longer than 1500 words (adult).
  2. Closing date: May 31st
  3. Results: Available to the public from the 12th of October 2019.
  4. Entries must be typewritten or word-processed on single-sided A4 paper, in 12-point typeface, double (or 1.5 times) spaced. Each page must carry the name of the story in the header or footer and pages must be numbered. Do not put your name on the story pages. Please attach a cover sheet with your name, address, telephone and if possible your e-mail contact details, title of your story, and word count. Entries may be emailed to wilkins@librariesunlimited.org.uk and a copy to myfanwyc@btinternet.com
  5. Entries may be delivered by hand or by post to Go Gothic – Flash Fiction Competition to Tavistock Library, The Quay, Plymouth Road, Tavistock, Devon, PL19 8HF, England. Please include your payment by cheque (in sterling) made payable to The Friends of Tavistock Library or BACS Transfer: Account name: Friends of Tavistock Library, Account number: 32152922, Sort code: 602149. Payment may also be made in cash at Tavistock Library.
  6. Entry fees: Adults – £3 for first entry, £2 for second or subsequent entry. If you intend to submit multiple entries, please submit all entries together.
  7. No manuscripts will be retained so contestants must keep a copy of their work.
  8. Copyright remains with the author.
  9. If acknowledgement of receipt is required, please include a stamped and addressed postcard.
  10. The judges’ decision is final, and no correspondence will be entered into.
  11. In accordance with the 2018 European Union General Data Protection Regulation Act (EU GDPR) your information will not be kept on a data base or used for marketing purposes and we will only contact you to tell you if you have won the competition and when all the logos will be on display.
  12. Entry to the competition implies acceptance of the rules.

 

 

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Filed under Events and diary dates, General competitions, Re-blogged

RonovanWrites Weekly Haiku: Poetry Prompt Challenge #227 #Truth&Honour

ronovan-writes-haiku-poertry-challenge-image-20161

The seeker of truth

will find honour and deceit

in equal measure

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Filed under As you read it, Haiku, Self compositions

Sue Vincent’s #Thursday photo prompt: Calm #writephoto

autumn-018-2

The stream looks calm, no ripple disturbs the surface. As if viewed in a mirror, images of the banks and wide sky form exact portraits of the landscape without the need of artist’s brush or photographer’s lens. The beauty of the scene is of no concern to you though.

It is Autumn and the waters of the brook are swollen after the first seasonal rains. Intuition tells you that changes will be taking place within the recent torrent. Now-placid and canal-like. This could be what you have been waiting for. From your pocket you take a jam-jar, emptied of it’s sticky contents, label removed and ready for use.

Three feet below the water’s surface the annual miracle has started. If, like some Old Testament miracle, the waters were to part, you would be able to witness an amazing spectacle.

Not trusting to any help from Moses your jam-jar will be required. Cautiously approaching the water’s edge you lie face down and place the jar on the surface. All the action is now laid bare to your eyes.

Before your eyes activity hidden from view is revealed. You are able to glimpse the private love act of salmo salar, the Atlantic salmon.

After years spent cruising the Atlantic ocean male fish known as jacks have answered an uncontrollable urge to return to their birthplace. The increasing depth of water due to  rain has enabled them to make their way up small rivulets. On their way the urge is so strong that they have no time to eat. Sea-lice has caused their scales to turn from fresh silver to a chalky white as they shrink and fall to the riverbed. Acquiring a deep blushing red the jaws resemble elongated hooks making the act of eating impossible anyway.

Females have laid millions of eggs in scrapes on the gravel beds and as the males release their milt it forms opaque clouds before settling on the eggs ready to  fertilise and start the new life necessary for the success of the species.

All this is revealed as you lean over the water’s edge with the jar resting  on the surface.

You take the jar and leave the fish to their devices’ knowing that within a few days with little rain the waters will return to their shallow state. Returning to the brook you will see many salmon stranded and dying, their work done.  Their bodies forming a bonanza feast for the local wildlife.

Meanwhile within the stream the fry will hatch and  soon be swimming, ready to face the trials of life and begin the cycle once more

 

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Filed under Factual, Flash fiction, nature inspired, Seasons, Self compositions

Memories of a Flanders field

The poppy’s power

to beautify corruption

will not diminish.

As ten thousand petals fall

then we will remember them

 

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Filed under From the heart, History, Inspired emotion, Loyal subject, Tanka

#Heeding Haiku With Chèvrefeuille, November 7th 2018 the voice of the wind

autumn-new-logo

The blushing leaves dance

with soft chattering whispers

coy before the breeze

 

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Filed under Haiku, nature inspired, Seasons, Self compositions

Time for Sue Vincent’s Thursday photo prompt: Stark #writephoto

stark

The tweet had come through to my phone whilst we were driving over to see my aged Mother. This was to be a surprise visit. For three weeks she had been pestering me to introduce my latest girlfriend to her. I suppose she was as shocked as I that a nice young girl was willing to accommodate my foibles, bad habits and awful sense of humour and be foolish enough to meet me more than once.

Every time I had ever mentioned a girl’s name I could imagine her plotting  a wedding. So far, she had been disappointed and I wasn’t sorry to keep dashing her hopes.

I could imagine her reaction when I had announced that I’d met someone and this crazy girl had expressed a desire to meet her despite my reservations and thinly veiled warnings.

The afore-mentioned was called Sally, and was beside me in the car. She picked up the phone when the notification sounded and told me that it was a tweet then asked if I was happy for her to read it for me.

It transpired that a Great grey shrike had been sighted about fourteen miles away from our destination. Sally was aware that I was a pretty keen birdwatcher and had occasionally sat quietly in  a bird hide with me and despite her probable boredom had manged to retain a sense of humour. I sensed that under the attractive exterior was a  closet twitcher.

This bird would be a first for me and as I always carried binoculars in the car this was an opportunity not to be missed. We stopped and taking the phone from her I checked the time of the message. Then we  pulled the atlas out of the glove compartment and with a growing excitement on my part, started to plan the route to the last known sighting place. We could  get there within half an hour. It was out at the edge of the moor, quite close to one of the narrow B roads that abound in that part of the country.

As we approached the site it was easy  to spot for there were quite a few cars drawn up along the grass verges. We followed suit and grabbing my binoculars and camera we headed for a break in the granite, dry-stone wall. Luckily the ground was dry as there had been unseasonably little rain for the past couple of months.

There was a small group of people standing about a hundred yards from the opening; a few standing next to tripods on which were perched cameras with telephoto lenses attached. Each as long and thick as one of my arms. All lenses pointing at a medium height ash tree with sharp, snapped limbs and very little leaf cover.

Sally and I tagged on the end of the semi-circle and raising my glasses I started to focus on the bare branches. It only took a couple of minutes to spot the first tell-tale sign of the shrike. Festooned over the spiky, short branches I spotted a frog, two mice and numerous large flying  insects, all hanging grotesquely like circus acrobats frozen in mid-swing. Each little corpse starkly silhouetted against  the darkening sky. A few twitched haphazardly in their death throes. I asked Sally if she wanted a look and was surprised at her eagerness to take the glasses from me. She asked me what was happening there so I explained about the rather gruesome habits of this bird, also known as the Butcher bird. Her fascination was palpable  when I explained that the bird catches prey when it can and uses a tree or sometimes a wire fence as a larder in case  food becomes scarce.

An excited  tremor passed through the group and all eyes went up as suddenly the focus of our attention turned to a small grey bird that flew rapidly back to the tree. Then it hopped from branch to branch looking for another natural hook on which to hang  the still struggling body of a field-mouse. Then he was off again and with my desire to add this bird to my list sated, Sally and I took a few photos of the grisly display. With a broad grin on both our faces we  returned to the car to continue our journey.

I was happy that Sally had been so interested  but the look on her face when I told her about the larder could be a bit worrying as it might show a different side to her character..

 

 

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Filed under As you read it, Flash fiction, nature inspired, Self compositions

RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #226 Question&Resolve

ronovan-writes-haiku-poertry-challenge-image-20161

To achieve your dreams,

never question your resolve,

success will follow

 

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Filed under Haiku, Self compositions

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