Monthly Archives: August 2018

Sue Vincent’s Thursday photo prompt: Summer #writephoto

summer

The white-fringed faces

turn expectantly toward

the bright Summer sun

eager to gain attention

from the bees and butterflies

 

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Filed under nature inspired, Seasons, Self compositions, Tanka

RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #214 Lack&Fool

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A lack of forethought

could make you appear a fool

foot and mouth disease

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Filed under As you read it, Haiku, Self compositions

Into the Void submission call

Submission to Issue 10 and the Fiction Prize Are Open!

We are accepting submissions of short stories, flash fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and visual art until September 7th. There’s no theme, and no fees until we reach our monthly free submissions limit, so get yours in quick!

We are also accepting submissions to the first annual Into the Void Fiction Prize, which has a first place prize of $1000 + publication in Into the Void, and a couple runner-up spots, for the best short stories up to 5000 words. We’re taking those submissions until October 31st. Get writing your best story ever.

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Filed under Events and diary dates, Submission calls

L haiku

In golden sunlight

two white butterflies make love

last waltz before death

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Filed under Factual, Haiku, nature inspired, Seasons, Self compositions

RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #213 Time&Movement

ronovan-writes-haiku-poertry-challenge-image-20161

guided by the sun

and it’s movement through  the sky

time was born of man

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Filed under Factual, Haiku, nature inspired, Seasons, Self compositions

Sue Vincent’s Thursday prompt #Writephoto The gleaming spires

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After a walk of about thirty-five minutes we came to a clearing before the trees lost their erratic spacing and stretched out before us on either side of what appeared to be a green lane. My first thought was that it must have been an old Roman road as it looked so straight but Gerry told me that it was probably far older than that. It was one of Alfred Watkin’s possible ley lines. Probably the straighest one that could be traced on the ground as well as on the map. I realised that by looking back over the way we had come I would probably have been able to see the trilithon we had been admiring earlier that morning. I was curious as to what the next point may be on the line. The answer was the old Hemingford Grey church which was just visible at the end of the avenue, especially if I used his binoculars. I took them from his hand and sure enough in the distance was the tall, grey spire just visible on the horizon. The sun appeared to be shining brightly over there, glinting off what was probably a weather-vane or perhaps a lightning conductor. Even with the glasses it was too far to make out. Gerald then turned and told me that before the war the church tower was quite awe-inspiring but sadly a spitfire pilot had come to grief at the very spot. Curious as to the story I pressed him to tell me more. I knew that this part of Cambridgeshire had many airfields during the war and there were a lot of pilot training facilities. It transpired that after one sortie a young pilot on only his second mission had been returning to his base having only one engine serviceable. Being inexperienced and not inured to the trials of war he was still quite headstrong and was certain that he could make it back to his base only twelve miles further on. The aircrew’s usual landmark for return was the spire of the church but sadly this time his second engine failed as he was passing the spire at low altitude ready to turn for home. With an injury to one arm he was unable to slide the cockpit canopy back and eject. Through sheer bad luck the plane spiralled down with him still inside, demolishing the whole spire as he plummeted to the ground and his death in the ensuing blaze. In memory of this event the authorities had left the spire un-repaired leaving it as a rather lower square tower. But to me that was impossble for had I not just seen the spire through the binoculars. I raised them to my eyes again and this time I could see only the flat crenellated tower as described. This left me in quite a severe state as I knew that earlier I had seen the church as it was more than sixty years previously. A chill came over me probably brought on by the thought of that poor airman but also because I was worried that this ley line might have some more curious tricks up it’s sleeve.

Based on the true story of hemingford church

 

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Filed under Factual, Flash fiction, History, Old knowledge, Self compositions

For those who enjoy writing flash fiction

Introducing the Flash Fiction Forum

Flash Fiction Forum - Reflex Fiction - ShortStops
Reflex Fiction is a quarterly international flash fiction competition for stories between 180 and 360 words. We publish one story every day as we count down to the winner of each competition.

Flash Fiction Forum

We’re very excited to announce a new feature on our website: the flash fiction forum – a place to share advice, ask questions, discuss stories and share your success. To celebrate the launch, we’re giving away ten free entries to our competition. Head over to the forum page for more details on how you could win a free shot our £1,000 prize.

Autumn 2018 Open for Entries

The entry period for our Autumn 2018 competition closes in one month. Here are the important details:

Prizes: £1,000 first, £500 second, £250 third (or the equivalent in your local currency)
Entry Fee: £7 / $9 / €9
Entries close: August 31, 2018
Judge: Annemarie Neary

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Filed under General competitions, Re-blogged